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house framing how-to?
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* May 24, 2018, 03:50:12 PM
Hi,
I've been looking around for a tutorial about designing stud walls, floor joists, and other aspects of framing a house using TurboCAD Mac Deluxe 10, but haven't found anything yet. I've seen sample projects that show the framing but nothing about how to use the software efficiently to create a framing plan. (I was kind of hoping for a wall tool that drew out the studs in plan view at my required spacing, magically filling in corners and window/door jack studs and so on as it went. Well, I can hope can't I?  ;D )

Can anyone suggest where such a tutorial might exist?

Thanks,

Rob

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May 24, 2018, 09:21:02 PM
#1
The best ones are on You Tube, as I didn't get very deep into that as a tutorial- Most of the work is done, you just set the various parametrs! :D

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* May 25, 2018, 12:04:37 AM
#2
All the videos I have seen show the use of the wall tools. Framing, joists, and rafters are more of a DIY project. Make a stud, floor joist, or rafter and use the gripper to drag out a copy and place. The gripper will constrain the axis direction, especially when working in isometric view. There are other tools such as "Linear Array" and "Path duplicate" for moving multiple boards quickly.

If you work in feet/inches set the resolution pretty tight, say 1/64". This will help prevent round up/down errors when doing copy and move multiple boards, the compound error will add up.

I'm including a framing project I did a while back. I still have some work to do but it has been pushed to the back burner for now.

Enjoy
Mitch

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* May 25, 2018, 07:14:08 AM
#3
Thanks Mitch. I think I saw that project or one much like it while looking through the forums. Nice work!

I'm disappointed to hear it's likely a manual process. Framing seems to be one of those things that really should be automated. I would expect that windows and doors dropped into walls created with the wall tool would be reflected in an elevation view of the wall framing. I should be able to pull them to one side to bump up against a stud to avoid redundant framing, as just one example of how useful smart-framing could be. Maybe the industry just draws generic walls and depends on contractors to use best practices? That works if you're willing to put up with their anything-but-best practices, but I'm not (said the grumpy old man).

Rob

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