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New TurboCAD Mac 2D/3D Training Essentials

help wanted in TC-MAC-pro-demo
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August 21, 2009, 12:55:56 PM
hello.

I'm New on this forum and also a complete novice  about 3D drawing.

I just downloaded TC-Mac-pro  to evaluate ; but I can not find out of  I need this version or simply the 2D/3D  version.

To evaluate this product I had to learn very quick how to draw in 3D.

I'm a modelbuilder /restaurator of Old and Historic modelschips and want to make moulds of schipboats and hull's in CNC . so that I can build the  boat arround it.
I have A front-Top left vieuw scanned from a book. and from these  *.Jpg's  I want to make  A 3D drawing.

Is there some tutorial who explains me how I can start with drawing this kind in 3D. I was reading the user manual, but this is really not a great help  in starting 3D.
I must start from this :
« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 01:11:05 PM by beagle »

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* August 21, 2009, 03:43:54 PM
#1
We do offer a 3d training guide for TurboCAD Mac v4 this can be purchased from the following link.

http://www.turbocad.com/TurboCAD/TurboCADforMacv4/Training/TurboCADMac3DTrainingGuide/tabid/1154/Default.aspx

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August 21, 2009, 04:11:42 PM
#2
Sorry for the language. I'm flemish spoken and writen so a don't always use the correct english word.
Thats an answer I was expected.:P ::) ;D ;D


If The software don't do what I want, I  have again paid for a book who don't serve for a dime and has to start over again whith an other vendor and other aproach.
What I want to know or see is that TC-Mac-pro can make a  net-surface of a boat or other object and that I can export that drawing  to the CNC -software, via a *Dxf file.

In the past I have to many times buy'd software where the seller say's that it can do what I want and I found it out to late that it doesn't.
So this time I want to be shure that  TC does the job what I must do. It is for a hobby and spending more than 1700 - 1900

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* August 22, 2009, 07:03:38 PM
#3
To import a jpg image, do file > import > 2D raster image and selelct jpeg from the list.


That boat hull would be difficult to draw. I am sure it is possible, but the curves would be difficult to get right. It may be possible using surfaces and splines etc though...

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August 24, 2009, 10:24:30 AM
#4
Thanks for the tip about import a *.jpg.

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September 12, 2009, 07:45:14 AM
#5
Hi Beagle,
I came across one of my old TC3 files that I thought might help you. Attached is a screen shot of a plywood skiff hull I eyeballed to try out the process.
 
1. Draw the bulkheads using a front workplane.
2. Lay out the station points / heights using a vertical line
3. Move the bulkheads to the station point lines.
4. Draw a spline from the stem to transom using the chine corners for snap points, repeat for the other side and sheer/gunnel's.
5. Use net surface for sides, using chine / sheer splines side of stem and transom for your m and n sides.

Adjust the resolution of surfaces to Superfine and check Precise Facets for best results.
 
You may have to adjust this process for your needs but it may help set you in the right direction. Your hull doesn't have chines but you may be able to add them without changing the shape of your bulkheads.
 
TC Pro V3 had a "two rail sweep" tool that made making the side panels easier.

Give it a shot,

Darren
« Last Edit: September 14, 2009, 02:36:43 PM by Darren »

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September 12, 2009, 12:01:30 PM
#6
Thanks for the reply.
But as you see on your own picture the sides of the dinghy are palnes.
What I had to acive is that the sides of the boat are fully curved. no straight line or flat surface  (except the stem) are on the boat.

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September 12, 2009, 01:26:58 PM
#7
Yes, I understand,
Try using the sheer / gunnel's and keel / centerline of each frame then.
 
Darren

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September 13, 2009, 04:10:58 AM
#8
Hoi remember that I had To learn 3D cad Drawing and as I wrote in the beginning. in TC ther is nu tutorial to learn to draw in 3D.
So I went to the concurrent "Viacad" for their tutorial.
 >:( :o

What I want :
Is their not an example to show me that the work I had to do , I can do it in TC. I was asking it to the local represntative; but He again can not answer.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2009, 09:08:53 AM by beagle »

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September 13, 2009, 09:40:40 AM
#9
Turbocad may not have a tutorial for boatbuilding because its a very specific/specialized area.
 
Turbocad.co.uk.com has a boatbuilding article under the case studies tab on their website, but I think its regarding Turbocad for windows
and its about plywood boat design. Its worth having a look at though.
 
I'll see if I have any luck making a soft bilge hull.
 
Darren
« Last Edit: September 13, 2009, 10:43:36 AM by Darren »

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* September 14, 2009, 11:31:39 AM
#10
One way to design a boat is to draw out each rib using the b-spline curve and line tool in 2d.  Once completed change the object type of the newly created ribs to lines then select the rib and change the z plane in the edit object screen, then use the b-spline to connect the ribs.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2009, 11:39:29 AM by Monizuka »

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September 14, 2009, 11:43:38 AM
#11
Whow

I must be very quick now. I just have 4 day's left in the trial version.
 :D
Quote
One way to design a boat is to draw out each rib using the b-spline curve and line tool in 2d.  Once completed change the object type of the newly created ribs to lines then select the rib and change the z plane in the edit object screen, then use the b-spline to connect the ribs.

Is there an other way to explain this for a "newbe in 3D."



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September 14, 2009, 02:40:40 PM
#12
I added two files to my post above, one picture and one .tcp file so you can open it and check it out.
 
Darren

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September 15, 2009, 04:52:30 AM
#13
Oeps  :o
For one raisopn or another I had only seeing the first  example.
But the hulltest2 is really what I need.

Thanks Darren

this was the demo to convince me to purchase TC   and start a new learning process.
The only remaining question, which version I need   The Pro or the 2/3D
« Last Edit: September 15, 2009, 04:56:29 AM by beagle »

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September 15, 2009, 06:16:16 PM
#14
Hi,
Go to the TurboCAD website, TurboCAD Mac Pro page, in the upper lefthand side select compare products for a PDF chart of the difference in features between Deluxe and Pro. It should help you decide.

It looks like Pro has a few more tools than Deluxe and the Photo Rendering. I have to say that Pro does a really good job at rendering.
 
Best Regards,
 
Darren

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